Who’s Fishing This Weekend: Early August

Aug 07, 2015

Author: Kyle Wilkinson

Another fantastic weekend of Colorado fly-fishing is at our doorstep!

If you've been paying attention to anything on this Blog, or perhaps been in the store lately, a pretty clear theme has probably been impressed up on you. Everyone around here is pretty fired up about the fishing conditions we're currently being dealt. The flows are fantastic, the bug life is abundant and the fish have been cooperating quite nicely. Here are our thoughts on some places that should surely get a bend in your fly rod over these next few days.

Deckers/Cheesman- Given that these are our homewaters, we can't not include them here. After months of requiring 4 digits to convey the CFS, Deckers and Cheesman are now in the low 300 range. Talk about game on. The fish are fat and happy right now from the high water and most have gone quite some time without any real angling pressure. Plus, to some degree it's like a new river out there. The limited exploring I've done up here lately (and this was in the 500-600 CFS range) is already showing new buckets and shelves formed as a result of the water events of these past few months.  I have no doubts the crowds will be abundant, but the quality of fishing should be worth it.  I'd 'match the hatch' and be prepared to fish surface or subsurface throughout the day. As is the case with virtually everywhere in the state right now, slapping around a hopper/dropper is sure to bring a few trout to hand as well. The weather looks good this weekend up here as well. 80 degrees for a high with the possibility of an afternoon thunderstorm. Game on. 

Dream Stream- I've been loving the Dream Stream lately but seeing it an under 200 CFS makes it look like a serious trickle....even though we were fishing it at 50 cfs all winter.  Either way, the fish don't seem to mind and have continued to cooperate nicely on some recent guide trips we've had there. It's super buggy down here right now so bring your BWO's,PMD's, Caddis, Yellow Sallies and Hoppers. If it were me heading here, I'd be covering water with a hopper/dropper and only switch to the nymph rig as an absolute last resort. Another nice result of the recent high water is that much of the knee high grass we'd normally be walking through has been matted down, making traversing the banks of this river a breeze. The weather down here is looking pretty prime as well. 75 and sunny with some passing clouds and maybe a sprinkle here or there. 

Frying Pan- If I had the whole weekend to get out of town and fish, I'd be headed to Basalt. If you've never experienced the 'Pan in all it's summertime, dry-fly glory then you're severely missing out. The Green Drakes are out (along with PMD's, BWO's, Midges and Caddis) and it never gets old seeing the fish in this river seemingly throw caution to the wind and attack your size 12 dry fly. Sight nymphing up near the toilet bowl has also been producing some quality fish for a few of our customers lately as well. Aside from the Frying Pan, heading this area also give you two other things to look forward to A) The Roaring Fork is only a few minutes away if you feel like switching things up B) Post-fishing margs at the Riverside Grill. The weather is looking pretty textbook as well here in the days to come. High 70's/Low 80's with perhaps an afternoon shower on Saturday. 

Colorado- The only thing that might keep me from heading to the Frying Pan would be if I had a drift boat handy. As I sit here watching the traffic zip down 6th Avenue, spending the day floating down the Colorado sounds pretty ideal. Nymphing a stonefly and a beadhead is likely going to be your most consistent producer, however a hopper on the banks or playing around with a streamer early/late is likely to turn some heads. Just writing about fishing this river right now is making me all fuzzy inside. As appears to be the case everywhere within a few hours of town, the weekend weather looks pretty textbook. 80 and sunny. 

High Country- While I realize this is a vague statement, I'm not going to spotlight anything specific here. There are countless smaller streams/tributaries waiting on public land all around us. The term everyone seems to be using these days for this type of fishing is 'blue lining'. Pick up a map, scan towards the mountainous regions, pick a little blue line running through them and head there. Fly selection won't be tough. Just make sure it's bushy and floats. These high mountain gems are only available to us for a few months each year and right now almost everyone of them should be in their prime. 

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